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Misdemeanor Probation

Violation of Misdemeanor Probation

Starting on October 1, 2015, the Hillsborough County Sheriff's Office took over the responsibility of supervising misdemeanor probation. After you enter a plea in the courtroom, if the court sentences you to probation, you must report to a probation officer and follow all of their instructions.

Misdemeanor probation officers in Hillsborough County monitor offenders that have been sentenced to probation. If the probation officer alleges that you didn't follow the rules or complete the special conditions of probation, then you can be accused of violating probation.

Any violation of probation comes with serious consequences. Probation violations fall within two categories - substantive violations for a new arrest and technical violations. Either way, if you are accused of violating misdemeanor probation, a no bond warrant can be issued for your arrest.

After you are arrested on the violation of probation warrant, you will be brought before the judge to either admit or deny that you violated probation. If you admit, the court can then revoke and termination your probation, continue you on probation, or sentence you to jail.

Talk with an experienced criminal defense attorney about the best way to resolve your case after an accusation for violating probation.

Attorney for Misdemeanor Probation Violations in Hillsborough County, FL

If you find out that your probation officer is going to allege that you violated your misdemeanor probation in Tampa or Plant City in Hillsborough County, FL, then seek out the services of an experienced criminal defense attorney.

The criminal defense attorneys at Sammis Law Firm in Tampa, FL, help clients accused of violating their probation either before or after the arrest warrant is issued.

Our main office is located in downtown Tampa, just a few blocks from the courthouse. Let us put our experience to work for you. Call 813-250-0500 today.


HCSO's Assumption of Misdemeanor Probation Services

An lnterlocal Agreement between David Gee, as Sheriff of Hillsborough County, Florida (HCSO) and Hillsborough County, became effective on October 1, 2015.

Under this agreement, HCSO agreed to provide supervision and rehabilitation services to misdemeanor probationers. The Clerk of the Court for the Thirteenth Judicial Circuit agreed to process all misdemeanor probation financial transactions and disburse fines and court costs paid by probationers.

In light of HCSO's assumption of misdemeanor probation services, the procedures regarding these services were updated in Administrative Order S-2015-054 which supersedes Administrative Order S-2010-026.


The Cost-of-Supervision Fee for Misdemeanor Probation

In accordance with section 948.09(l)(b), Florida Statutes, all persons placed on misdemeanor probation or a diversionary program under the supervision of HCSO, will pay a monthly cost-of-supervision fee of $75 for the first month and $55 per month thereafter to HCSO and a one-time fee of $12 to the Clerk. The Clerk fee is for collecting, processing and accounting for all misdemeanor probation cost-of-supervision financial transactions in accordance with the Interlocal Agreement.

The Clerk of Court for the Thirteenth Judicial Circuit in Hillsborough County will collect cost-of-supervision fees and deposit them into a specified account in accordance with the Interlocal Agreement.

HCSO will provide a monthly invoice to Hillsborough County no later than the tenth day of each month. The Clerk will also collect and disburse payments of Clerk fees, restitution, court costs, fines, surcharges and any indigent status application fees from misdemeanor probationers.

The Clerk of Court is required to maintain an accurate accounting of all monies collected, deposited and disbursed, unless restitution is ordered to be paid to a victim under section 948.09, Florida Statutes.

The Clerk will assign the first $50 of any fees or costs paid by an indigent misdemeanor probationer as payment of the application fee, in accordance with section 27.52(1)(c), Florida Statutes.


This article was last updated on Friday, November 9, 2018.